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Welbore Ellis, Baron Mendip

Welbore Ellis, 1st Baron Mendip, Member of Parliament, was buried in the north transept of Westminster Abbey on 7th February 1802 aged 88. He has no monument or gravestone. He was a younger son of the Right Reverend Welbore Ellis, bishop of Kildare and later of Meath in Ireland, and his wife Diana (Briscoe) and was born on 15th December 1713 in Kildare. Like his father he was educated at Westminster School, where he was captain of the Kings Scholars, and Oxford university. He succeeded to the properties of two of his uncles and was a wealthy man. As well as an M.P. he was treasurer of the Navy, Privy Councillor and Secretary of State for the American colonies in 1782. He had a valuable library and was a trustee of the British Museum. In 1794 he was created Baron Mendip of Mendip in Somerset. His first wife was Elizabeth Stanhope and his second was Anne Stanley who was buried with him on 13th December 1803. As he had no children his title passed to his great nephew. His nephew Charles Agar was also buried with him.

See the website entry for Charles Agar (Welbore is mentioned on his inscription).

Further reading

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

Born

15th December 1713

Buried

7th February 1802

Location

North Transept

Memorial Type

Grave

Welbore Ellis, Baron Mendip
Welbore Ellis, 1st Baron Mendip by Karl Anton Hickel

© National Portrait Gallery, London [Creative Commons CC BY-NC-ND 3.0]

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At different times of the day, or in different seasons, the light falling in the Abbey will light up something that you have walked past a million times and never seen before.

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Vanessa, Head of Conservation

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