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Westminster Abbey and Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Public worship will resume in the Abbey from 3rd December, and we will be open for visiting on selected days from 11th December.

In the meantime, the Abbey remains open for individual prayer and you are welcome to visit at the following times:

Monday - Saturday: 10:00am - 3:00pm
Sunday: 12:30pm - 2:00pm

Mary Hope

In the south transept of Westminster Abbey is a white marble monument to Mary Hope put up by her husband John, a wealthy London merchant. The sculptor was Robert Adam and James Adam paid the fee for the monument in 1768. The inscription reads:

To the memory of Mary Hope who died at Brockhall in the county of Northampton on the 25th of June 1767 aged 25 & whose remains unnotice'd lie in the neighbouring church at Norton, this stone, an unavailing tribute of affliction, is by her husband erected and inscribed. She was the only daughter of Eliab Breton of Forty Hall, Middlesex, Esqr. and was married to John Hope of London, merchant, to whom she left three infant sons: Charles, John and William.
Tho' low in earth, her beauteous form decay'd, my faithful wife, my lov'd Maria's laid, in sad remembrance the afflicted raise no pompous tomb, inscrib'd with venal praise. To statesmen, warriors, and to kings belong the trophied sculpture and the poets song; And these the proud, expiring, often claim, their wealth bequeathing, to record their name: But humble virtue, stealing to the dust, heeds not our lays or monumental bust. To name her virtues ill befits my grief; What was my bliss can now give no relief; A husband mourns, the rest let friendship tell: Fame spreads her worth, a husband knew it well

Further reading

A design is in the Sir John Soane's Museum in London

Died

25th June 1767

Location

South Transept

Memorial Type

Tablet

Material Type

Marble

Mary Hope
Mary Hope memorial

This image can be purchased from Westminster Abbey Library

Image © 2020 Dean and Chapter of Westminster

I’ve worked here for over thirty years and have seen many of the major services - it’s strange to realise that you are in a small way part of history.

Pamela - Rector's Secretary

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