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Kings, queens, statesmen and soldiers; poets, priests, heroes and villains - the Abbey is a must-see living pageant of British history. Every year Westminster Abbey welcomes over one million visitors who want to explore this wonderful 700-year-old building. Thousands more join us for worship at our daily services. The Abbey is in the heart of London. Once inside audio guides are available in 12 languages or there is the highly-popular verger-led tour.

Visit Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey is one of the world’s great churches, with a history stretching back over a thousand years and an essential part of any trip to London.

Opening Times

Wednesday 4 March

Open 09:30 - 18:00

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Westminster Abbey is usually open to visitors from Monday to Saturday throughout the year. On Sundays and religious holidays such as Easter and Christmas, the Abbey is open for worship only. All are welcome and it is free to attend services.

Getting to the Abbey


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Westminster Abbey is in the heart of London - next to Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament. Two major railway stations, two London Underground stations and regular red London buses will take you close to the Abbey doors.

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Verger guided tour

Verger guided tour
Verger-led tours of the Abbey are available, in English, for individuals or family groups only (and not for larger parties or school visits). They start at the North Door, last for approximately 90 minutes and include a tour of the Shrine (containing the tomb of Saint Edward the Confessor), the Royal Tombs, Poets' Corner, the Cloisters and the Nave.

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Abbey Treasures: Lady Chapel

Abbey Treasures: Lady Chapel
The Lady Chapel was begun in 1503 and constructed at the expense of Henry VII. It is the last great masterpiece of English medieval architecture. In 1545 John Leland called it "the wonder of the entire world".

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The Coronation Chair

The Coronation Chair
The Coronation Chair was made for King Edward I to enclose the famous Stone of Scone, which he brought from Scotland to the Abbey in 1296, where he placed it in the care of the Abbot of Westminster.

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