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Westminster Abbey and Coronavirus (COVID-19)

The Abbey and St Margaret's Church are currently closed for general visiting but we remain open for worship and you are welcome to join us at our daily services.

The Abbey is also open for individual prayer from 10:30am - 12:30pm, Monday to Saturday.

Passion and Pandemic: Seminar I

Passion and Pandemic: Seminar I

Date Time Location Price

The first in a specially-curated series of contemplative lunchtime seminars for Passiontide and Holy Week.

At each seminar, a different art historian and theologian will focus on pictures from the National Gallery’s collection and explore themes of salvation, frailty, isolation, and sickness.

In this first seminar, Professor Joanna Cannon (Courtauld Institute) and the Reverend Dr Jamie Hawkey (Westminster Abbey and Clare College, Cambridge) will introduce a diptych of the Virgin and Child and Man of Sorrows by the artist known as The Master of the Borgo Crucifix.

This 45 minute lunchtime seminar is designed as a preparation for Holy Week and Easter, and is part of an online series offered by the Abbey during the COVID-19 pandemic to inspire hope and reflection on the Passion of Christ.

Image: Detail from Umbrian Diptych, Master of the Borgo Crucifix (Master of the Franciscan Crucifixes), c.1255-60. © The National Gallery, London


Tickets

To register to attend the seminar (free), visit the Eventbrite website.

Registration closes at 4:00pm on Wednesday 17th March. After initial broadcast, all seminars in this series will be available to watch on the Abbey's YouTube channel.

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At different times of the day, or in different seasons, the light falling in the Abbey will light up something that you have walked past a million times and never seen before.

Vanessa, Head of Conservation

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